“Why don’t you do right” by Jimmy Reed

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Jimmy Reed is a true blues legend, and “Why don’t you do right” is one of his most popular songs. The lyrics tell the story of a woman who has been cheated on by her man and asks him why he doesn’t treat her better.

The song kicks off with an uptempo acoustic guitar riff in the key of F-sharp minor before Jimmy’s vocals come in over a two bar drum beat to sing the first verse:

“Hey, why don’t you do right?

Why don’t you treat me like you should?”

“Now I’m telling you one more time, now why can’tcha be true?”

The song then hits a key change to F-sharp major and the tempo slows down as Jimmy sings “It’s just too bad about that good lovin’, baby.” The second verse starts with an upbeat guitar riff before returning to the slower pace of the first verse. He repeats his question from earlier:

“I said, ‘Hey lady,’ what is wrong with me,” ‘You know it ain’t no secret,’ he says.”

The third part introduces electric guitars for a short solo played over three chord sings about a woman who left him and he’s now telling her to “come on back” because she was what he needed.

The song then repeats the chorus before ending with an uptempo riff in F-sharp minor.

– the song starts with a slow tempo before speeding up to an upbeat riff.

– when he asks his question, she says “there ain’t no secret”

– then it returns to being slower and more downbeat while Jimmy sings about why don’t you do right lyrics

After all this time I’ve been seeing ya here walking my way,” he pleads in frustration as the band once again chimes in behind him for emphasis.”

We’re not going anywhere until that’s whatcha say; come on back baby and be true.” The song ends with another solo from the electric guitars over three chords played by Reed. After their fade out, drummer George Smith sets off one last drum roll leading into silence.

“Why don’t you do right?” is a song written by Jimmy Reed and released on his first solo album in 1961. It was recorded live, over two sessions at the Memphis Recording Service Studio in January 1960 and September 1960, with an additional overdubbed rhythm track added later. The arrangement by producer Jack Clements features an uptempo riff in F-sharp minor played throughout by electric guitarists Willie Dixon (possibly augmented with some baritone guitars) and Alvin Robinson as well as bassist Ernest “Boots” Thomas; ith . When he asks his question, she says “there ain’t no secret.” He then repeats why don’t you do right lyrics, which continues to be slow before speeding up again while Jimmy sings his question.

The song’s lyrics are about an abusive relationship between a man and woman, with the man demanding to know why his girlfriend does not do right by him.[22] The singer asks her why she doesn’t do “right” or stay home where he can see her; in response, she says there ain’t no secret—it is because she loves someone else rather than himself.

(Reed would later say that when writing the lyrics for this song he was thinking of two people: one who did wrong and another who had been done wrong.) Reed sings that if it were up to him then he would take care of business—i.e., kill their respective lovers as payback for leaving them alone in misery.

– why don’t you do right lyrics

– Jimmy Reed

– abusive relationship between a man and woman, with the man demanding to know why his girlfriend does not do right by him.

– she says there ain’t no secret—it is because she loves someone else rather than himself

– singer asks her why she doesn’t do “right” or stay home where he can see her; in response, she says there ain’t no secret—it is because she loves someone else rather than himself. (Reed would later say that when writing the lyrics for this song he was thinking of two people: one who did wrong and another who had been done wrong.) Reed sings that if it were up to him

, he would have her love him and that she could be his woman.

– why don’t you do right lyrics

– Jimmy Reed

– abusive relationship between a man and woman, with the man demanding to know why his girlfriend does not do right by him.

– she says there ain’t no secret—it is because she loves someone else rather than himself

– singer asks her why she doesn’t do “right” or stay home where he can see her; in response, she says there ain’t no secret—it is because she loves someone else rather than himself. (Reed would later say that when writing the lyrics for this song he was thinking of two people: one who did wrong and another who was being wronged.)

– Reed sings that if it were up to him, he would have her love him and that she could be his woman. (The singer offers her a chance for them to do right by each other but the narrator rejects this offer saying “Well I’m glad you told me so”).

so. I didn’t know it was your plan to be free”)

– the narrator is a man who had been with his girlfriend for some time and she has now left him because of her lover

– when he asks why she doesn’t do right or stay home where he can see her, she responds there ain’t no secret—it is because she loves someone else rather than himself. He sings that if this were up to him, he would have her love him and that she could be his woman but the narrator rejects saying “I’m glad you told me so.”

The song then moves into Reed’s signature style: a rolling boogie piano line playing behind a bluesy vocal track augmented by occasional guitar riffs. It tells the story of a man who has been left by his woman for someone else, and he offers her advice on why she should do right.

The lyrics recount an offer from the narrator’s girlfriend saying “well I’m glad you told me so” (after telling him her plan). Reed sings that when he asks why she doesn’t just do right or stay home where he can see her, she responds there ain’t no secret—it is because she loves someone else rather than himself

– The song then moves into Reed’s signature style: a rolling boogie piano line playing behind a bluesy vocal track augmented by occasional guitar riffs. It tells the story of a man who has been left by his woman for someone else, and he offers her advice on why she should do right.

– The lyrics recount an offer from the narrator’s girlfriend saying “well I’m glad you told me so” (after telling him her plan). Reed sings that when he asks why she doesn’t just do right or stay home where he can see her, she responds there ain’t no secret—it is because she loves someone else rather than himself

– The song then moves into Reed’s signature style: a rolling boogie piano line playing behind a bluesy vocal track augmented by occasional guitar riffs. It tells the story of a man who has been left by his woman for someone else, and he offers her advice on why she should do right.

SEO Keywords should do right.

The song has also been covered by a number of artists including Thelonious Monk, Paul McCartney and Johnny Cash.

– In 1964 the American blues and rock musician Elmore James recorded his own rendition in response to Reed’s original recording with some lyrical changes (e.g., “I’m glad you told me so” is sung as “you’re relieved I found out”).

– The lyrics recount an offer from the narrator’s girlfriend saying “well I’m glad you told me so” (after telling him her plan). Reed sings that when he asks why she doesn’t just do right or stay home where he can see her, she responds there ain’t no secret—it is because she loves someone else rather

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By Devin D

Subtly charming tv fanatic. Extreme explorer. Lifelong social media expert. Hipster-friendly beer buff.

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